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The Southern Treat

Hi folks! Welcome back and it’s great to have you here! I hope you enjoyed the previous recipe.

Today I have another awesome treat for you. So soon after the holidays you must have a lot of leftover turkey. It would be a shame for that to go to waste, so this recipe comes from my good friends at British Turkey! They’re an amazing bunch and they love turkey more than anyone. Have a look at all these amazing turkey recipes!

Let’s make a turkey jambalaya!

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What you need:

4 tsp olive oil
1 onion, chopped
1 red and 1 green pepper, de-seeded and chopped
4 sticks celery, chopped
2 large cloves garlic, crushed
4 spicy sausages or chorizo, sliced into chunks
400g leftover British turkey breast, cut into cubes
2 red chillies, deseeded and finely chopped
500g long-grain rice
2 tbsp turmeric
2 tbsp Cajun spices
1 tsp Tabasco
2 pints chicken stock
3 tomatoes, chopped
4 tbsp frozen peas
450g prawns
Salt and black pepper

Heat the oil in a large pan and fry the onion, peppers, celery, garlic and sausage for about ten minutes.

Add the cooked turkey, chillies, rice, spices and Tabasco, stirring well so the rice is well mixed in. In case you cannot find Cajun spices at your store, you can try to make your own and this is what you need:

  • 2 1/2 teaspoons thyme
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 5 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon coriander seed

Pour in the stock and bring to the boil. Then add the tomatoes, peas and prawns and reduce heat to simmer for about 30-40 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste for seasoning, adding salt, pepper and more spices if required and voilà dinner is ready!

I made this for my friends during our NFL Wild Card round and we were blown away how good it was. It had a gentle kick from all the spices and all the flavors came together so beautifully. It was a great culinary experience. I thoroughly recommend it!

Thanks for coming back and I’ll see you next time for another tasty treat! Come by my Facebook Page for some additional goodies!

14 comments on “The Southern Treat

  1. Profiteroles & Ponytails
    January 11, 2013

    This looks a lot like the Arroz con Pollo that I made recently — but with different seasonings (and turkey rather than chicken of course). It looks like you enjoy cooking with cast iron pans too!

    • tudorteodorescu88
      January 11, 2013

      Hello there! I appreciate the comment and I’ve checked your blog and it’s very nice.

      You will love one of my next recipes, because it’s perfect for children. I call them “chicken shells”, I will post it on Tuesday.

      In the kitchen I use whatever I have and sometimes I have to improvise, but I really like this pan, it was a present from Spain. Things don’t stick to it and it retains heat really well.

      I’ve looked up the Arroz con Pollo and you are right, it’s very similar to the jambalaya, which in turn is similar to Paella. I’ll have to give your recipe a try and also try some of your delicious chocolate cakes.

  2. Autism United
    January 15, 2013

    Perfect for all the leftover turkey. I freeze my leftover turkey in small portions so I can grab for just this reason. A great looking recipe. And I know we haven’t had a turkey jambalaya yet with turkey. Thanks!

    • tudorteodorescu88
      January 15, 2013

      Thank you for the comment! It was the first time I’ve ever tried a turkey jambalaya and it was really nice. I thoroughly recommend it.

      I did the same with my turkey leftovers, frozen and used up for various other dishes.

      You can do so much with it.

  3. Eva Taylor
    January 15, 2013

    I still have a ton of turkey left overs from this past Sunday as we had our do-over Christmas (because my niece and nephew were sick at Christmas) even though I just made two dishes with left over turkey, one was a Hungarian turkey paprikas with dumplings and the other was a Thai green curry turkey with Jasmine rice. I thought I would be sick to death of turkey by now and then I see your great recipe. And it’s perfect timing because we have our good friends coming up on the weekend from Illinois and Jambalaya is one of their favourites. It’s so nice that there isn’t a lot of time spent nor is it complicated, just chop and stir (we may imbibe a bit and I like to stay away from complicated ;-)!). Sounds like a fantastic one-pan meal, thanks.

    • tudorteodorescu88
      January 15, 2013

      Thanks Eva, I appreciate the comment. Paprikash or Paprikas, is such a great dish. I love it, when I used to live close to Hungary I always used to go there and eat it. I think I will have to ask some of my relatives and get a nice traditional recipe from them and write about it. Thanks for the idea.

      Your meal sounds delicious. I hope to see some pics and posts about it.

      I used to have a very low opinion of turkey, until I found British Turkey, this website taught how to cook turkey in ways I couldn’t dream of. They have hundreds of recipes there with turkey.

      Please try this jambalaya, it’s so easy, and so delicious. 3 easy steps, one pan. My friends said it was the best thing I’ve cooked so far.

      The best thing about it is that it comes out so buttery, because of the chicken stock.

      Please let me know if you try it I’d love to hear what you and your family think about it.

      • Eva Taylor
        January 15, 2013

        Thanks Tudor, are you Hungarian? I am first generation Canadian of Hungarian parents. I’ve been to Hungary several times but have only lived in North America (New York, Montreal and Toronto).
        I’ll check out that turkey site. I find all meats taste quite differently in different countries because of how they raise them and feed them. Our turkey tastes rather gamey.

    • tudorteodorescu88
      January 15, 2013

      Hi Eva. No, I was born in Romania, in the Northern part of Transylvania. We were very close to Hungary. That’s why I am familiar with paprikash. I’ve moved to England a few years ago, it’s almost 7 soon.

      Turkey in England is quite flat in terms of taste, that’s why it’s perfect for marinating so I find it leaves you a lot of room to be creative and experiment with flavors.

      So you have Hungarian roots, explains why you cook so well.

      Check this site out, they are amazing and very friendly http://www.ilovebritishturkey.co.uk.

      I’m going to do a video for them soon, so I’ll let you know. It will be a video about cooking something with turkey.

      • Eva Taylor
        January 16, 2013

        My cousin’s father’s lot was from Transylvania, in fact, I just had dinner with her last night. Her father always claimed to be a true Hungarian and not Romanian because when he was born there it was still Hungary. Both my cousin and I were born in Canada but she still has relatives in Romania (and I in Hungary).
        Thank you for your compliment, I am flattered. Do you speak Hungarian? I learned to read, write and speak at a very young age, but it’s difficult to maintain since I have very few people to speak to and I only visit Hungary every few years.
        Thanks for the link, I’ll be right over.

    • tudorteodorescu88
      January 16, 2013

      Hi Eva! I can only reply to a comment once. Strange.

      I’m afraid I do not speak Hungarian, I hope to learn it at some point. I love languages and I am a native English-Romanian speaker and I’ve learned French in school. And now Russian is my next language I want to learn.

      Transylvania still has a a lot of Hungarians there and also Germans. Transylvania was part of the Astrain-Hunagrian Empire before and during World War 1. It was re-united with Romania (Valahia and Molodova) in 1918.

      I’m happy, our part of the country is much nicer than the South and East. That’s due to the Germans and Hungarians.

      I forgot to mention gulash, I want to do a post about that very soon. I think it would be a great recipe.

      • Eva Taylor
        January 17, 2013

        Thanks Tudor. Hungarian is a language that has no specific roots, although they have linked some of the words to the Scandinavian languages — it won’t be easy to learn, but you can always practice with me.
        I have never been a huge fan of Gulyásleves but years ago my Mom brought me back a traditional Gulyásleves pot, so I probably should make it one day, just to use the pot for the photo!

  4. tudorteodorescu88
    January 15, 2013

    Hi Eva. No, I was born in Romania, in the Northern part of Transylvania. We were very close to Hungary. That’s why I am familiar with paprikash. I’ve moved to England a few years ago, it’s almost 7 soon.

    Turkey in England is quite flat in terms of taste, that’s why it’s perfect for marinating so I find it leaves you a lot of room to be creative and experiment with flavors.

    So you have Hungarian roots, explains why you cook so well.

    Check this site out, they are amazing and very friendly http://www.ilovebritishturkey.co.uk.

    I’m going to do a video for them soon, so I’ll let you know. It will be a video about cooking something with turkey.

  5. awkwardlights
    March 27, 2013

    I suddenly felt hungry haha thank you for this! Shall definitely try 😀

    • tudorteodorescu88
      March 27, 2013

      Thank you so much for your comment!

      I’m glad to hear that you liked this recipe. Jambalaya is one of my favorite dishes.

      I’m sure you’ll love it too!

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© Tudor Teodorescu and tudorsmenubar, 2013. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Tudor Teodorescu and tudorsmenubar with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.
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